MongoDB

MongoDB is a source-available cross-platform document-oriented database program for high-volume storage. Classified as a NoSQL database program, MongoDB uses JSON-like documents with optional schemas.


Plans and Pricing

There are two kinds of database cluster plans you can choose from: single node clusters and high availability clusters.

  • Single node clusters begin at $15.00 per month for a single node cluster with 1 GB of RAM. Single node clusters are not highly available. We recommend these clusters for preliminary development and testing.

  • High availability clusters begin at $45.00 per month for the 1 GB RAM/1 vCPU plan when you add standby nodes for automatic failover. We only support three node replica sets for high availability MongoDB clusters. For more information about MongoDB’s high availability cluster architecture, see MongoDB’s official documentation.

Inbound and outbound data transfer is included in the price of the cluster.

Machine Type

All managed databases are deployed onto Droplets. You can choose to deploy your managed database on a Droplet with a CPU that is shared with other DigitalOcean users, or deploy it on a machine with a dedicated CPU.

Learn more about shared CPU vs. dedicated CPU and the best use cases for each kind of plan in Choosing the Right Droplet Plan.

Machine Type CPU vCPUs Memory
Basic Shared 1 - 8 1 - 16 GB RAM
General Purpose Dedicated 2 - 40 8 - 160 GB RAM
4 GB RAM / vCPU
Storage-Optimized Dedicated 2 - 32 16 - 256 GB RAM
8 GB RAM / vCPU
150 - 225 GB SSD / vCPU

Review the region availablity matrix to see which machine types are available for each region.

Regional Availability

MongoDB database clusters are in General Availability in the following regions:

MongoDB Machine TypeNYC1NYC3AMS3SFO3SGP1LON1FRA1TOR1BLR1
Shared CPU
General Purpose
Storage-Optimized "Low availability"
Memory-Optimized

Learn more about regional availability.

Features

Managed Database Cluster Features

  • Daily point-in-time backups. Full cluster backups are taken daily and write-ahead-logs are maintained to allow you to restore to any point-in-time within the previous seven days.

  • High availability with automated failover. In the event of a failure, managed databases with a standby node will automatically switch data handling to the standby node to prevent unplanned downtime. Learn more about high availability for managed databases.

  • End-to-end security. Data is encrypted at the media level while at rest, and with SSL during transit.

  • Cluster metrics and alerting. Cluster metrics visualizations help you monitor the performance of the nodes in a database cluster, like resource usage, to guide capacity planning and optimization. Alert policies notify you when a metric rises above or falls below a threshold you set, like high CPU or low memory.

Managed Database Cluster Limits

  • By default, you are limited to 10 clusters per account or team. If you reach this limit but need to create more database clusters, you can submit a request for a higher limit by clicking “Request Increase” on the window that shows when you attempt to create another cluster.

  • You cannot resize cluster nodes to smaller sizes. To move from a bigger node to a smaller node, create a new cluster with the desired node size and import your data.

  • You cannot delete the default database and user.

  • Point-in-time-recovery (PITR) is limited to the last 7 days.

  • VPC networks are only available to resources, accounts, and teams in the same region as the VPC network.

  • You cannot currently add DigitalOcean Cloud Firewalls to a database cluster’s trusted sources.

  • By default, database clusters only support 100 trusted sources. Each trusted source must resolve to a single IP address, and Droplets typically have two IP addresses (public and private). Therefore, if you are directly adding Droplets as a trusted source, adding 50 Droplets will reach the limit. If you need to add more than 100 trusted sources, contact DigitalOcean support.

  • You cannot migrate databases from clusters inside of DigitalOcean to other clusters inside of DigitalOcean using the online migration feature.

  • When you restore from a backup, you must restore to a new node and re-add any read-only or standby nodes. See How to Restore from Backups for details.

MongoDB Limits

  • Each cluster is limited to 3 nodes.

  • We support only MongoDB v4.4.

  • DigitalOcean Managed Databases MongoDB clusters do not support the following features:

    • Query statistics
    • Read-only nodes
    • Connection pooling
    • Current and long-running queries
  • To maintain cluster stability, users cannot access the superuser role.

  • You cannot add users to a MongoDB cluster using the mongo shell. Users must be added to the cluster using the DigitalOcean Control Panel.

  • DigitalOcean Managed MongoDB does not support server-side Javascript. We support MongoDB’s more recent and secure Aggregation Pipeline framework.

  • MongoDB clusters cannot be migrated to other regions at this time.

  • You cannot resize cluster nodes to smaller sizes. To move from a bigger node to a smaller node, create a new cluster with the desired node size and import your data.

  • MongoDB clusters suffer severe issues when their disk space becomes completely full. To prevent this, we block further writes to a cluster when its disk reaches 97% capacity. To remove this block, see our support article.

Known Issues

Managed Database Cluster Known Issues

  • You must use a third-party client to manage access control lists (ACLs). You can add users and databases from the DigitalOcean Control Panel.

  • You can’t use DigitalOcean’s Cloud Firewalls with managed databases. Until support is available, you can restrict access to nodes by their incoming IPv4 addresses. You can also add Droplets and other resources by their names or tags to a cluster’s trusted sources.

Latest Updates

13 April 2022

6 January 2022

9 August 2021

  • MongoDB is now available as a managed database engine in the AMS3, BLR1, FRA1, LON1, NYC1, NYC3, SFO3, SGP1, and TOR1 regions.

For more information, see all MongoDB release notes.